How Origami Is Innovating Technology

Origami dates back to the 17th century in Japan, but it wasn’t until the mid-20th century that people began to consider the practice an art form due, in large part, to origami master Akira Yoshizawa. Since then, origami has gone on to become a respected art and now a tool to revolutionize science and technology. For example, the patterns and folds in origami, when applied …

Solar Panels Disguised As Terracotta Tiles

Dyaqua is a family-owned Italian company that makes traditional-looking terracotta roof tiles that disguise solar photovoltaic cells. These solar panels, which the company named Invisible Solar, are almost indistinguishable from Italy’s historic roof tiles, yet they are made from a polymer that allows sunlight to filter through. Within, hand-placed photovoltaic cells capture light to convert to energy. Already, Invisible Solar is installed in Pompeii with …

Using Abandoned Mines to Store Renewable Energy

There are roughly 550,000 abandoned mines in the US. This vast amount of space might be the solution for scientists who have been researching ways to store renewable energy. In a study led by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, researchers devised a gravity battery using millions of mines worldwide. For this concept, they proposed lowering sand underground when energy is at its peak. …