These minimal cotton-blend socks are a sophisticated ode to the brand Blue Blue Japan’s homeland. With a red dot knitted into the fabric, these calf-high socks make a subtle but expressive reference to the island nation’s flag.

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Hand-Dyed Indigo Shibori Logo Shirt

$25

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Made in both upstate New York and Brooklyn, from super-soft Shibori indigo-dyed cotton, each of these T-shirts looks a little different. Every one, however, is adorned with a bright orange version of the familiar DFA Records lightning bolt logo. They’re available in adult and kid sizes.

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Field Good Trowel

$22

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Rikumo’s Field Good Trowel is ergonomic, lightweight and sturdy—thanks to its clever design and tough polyurethane-coated steel. Also available in white, black or gold, each piece is crafted in Niigata (in Japan’s Chūbu region), which is known for its metalworking history.

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Karmi Tea Canister

$147

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Made by the 100-year-old Japanese wood-turning company Gato Mikio, this minimal canister is intended to hold tea (up to about 100g of loose leaves) but it can store just about anything that’s size appropriate. Composed of Cherry Birch, each vessel is carefully produced by hand in the Ishikawa Prefecture.

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Made for kids, Gentemstick’s Snowripper 146 board is based on the adult-sized Flying Carpet, but offers plenty of float for learners. The brand approaches snowboarding product design from a philosophical, lifestyle angle, and that’s evident here in its progressive Flat Camber system. Price is in Japanese yen.

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Made from semi-lead crystal (a harmless material that stands out for its color-retention and shine), this two-piece carafe set is as design-forward as it is functional. Available in clear, blue or gray, each set is handmade by Toyo Sasaki—a well respected company with history dating back to 1888.

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This 13-inch postal case from Human Made is just the right size for a laptop or some valuables you’d rather not misplace—a phone, passport, wallet or a tablet. Though it looks like a standard-issue postal envelope, this one is made from 100% polyester, has a velcro seal and a bright orange padded interior. Price is in Japanese Yen.

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Japan: The Cookbook

$34

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Japan: The Cookbook includes 400 recipes from one of the world’s most respected food cultures—written and collected by food writer Nancy Singleton Hachisu. At almost 500 pages, the book is expansive and sprawls from first to last course by region. Ultimately, the collection forms a comprehensive guide to the nation’s brilliant culinary history.

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Buaisou’s handmade indigo garments, cloths and tapestries have an undeniable uniqueness. Slight variations in color (thanks to the dyeing process, washes and fading) only add to their character. This apron, made from 52% cotton and 48% linen, is lightweight but durable. The cross-back button straps reduce strain and a pouch pocket offers reinforced storage.

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POPEYE Magazine Issue #857

$20

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Japan’s POPEYE magazine—a clever cultural aggregate—does a great job at encapsulating city life and travel through the lens of street culture. The September 2018 issue focuses on burgers and fast food—featuring several spots in Tokyo, a vending machine in the countryside of Eastern Japan, a burger stand in Hawaii, and much more.

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Nanamica

Wind Cap

$115

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Composed of micro-polyester taffeta with a water-repellent coating, Nanamica’s wind cap can successful handle the elements. It’s the vibrant yellow colorway that truly stands out from others in this category. From Japan’s Nanamica, the cap’s details—six-panel construction, embroidery, adjustable strap—all demonstrate superb attention to detail.

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Curious Corners Studio

Yamato Indigo Leather Coasters

$48

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Coasters can be kitsch, dull or oftentimes overly-branded. This set of gradient indigo-dyed ones isn’t any of that. Hand-dyed and then treated with natural leather oil, these sophisticated coasters elevate cocktail hours. And, because they’re dyed by hand, each one is entirely unique—with some of the flaws being exactly what’s most charming about them.

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Prospective Flow

Suna Hat

$80

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Translated from Japanese, Sashiko stitching means “little stabs” or “little pierces.” This is the technique with which Prospective Flow’s Suna Hat has been crafted. Made from 100% cotton, this tulip style accessory is durable and packable—perfect for getaways. Available in three colorways—faded black, olive or natural—this off-white is our pick.

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Belly Kids

Shoeshi Book

$9

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Onigiri artist Yujia Hu makes wildly detailed sneaker-shaped sushi from iconic designs like Air Jordans, Chuck Taylors, Stan Smiths and more. First creating the little treasures in his family’s restaurant Sakana Sushi in Milan, Hu is now sharing all his tricks and tips to make sneaker sushi at home. These recipes and techniques are outlined in Shoeshi, the artist’s debut book. Price is in British Pounds.

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Roland + Karimoku

Roland Kiyola Piano

$4300

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Equal parts luxuriant oak furniture and technically-advanced musical keyboard, the Roland Kiyola Piano is a MoMA Design Store exclusive. Handcrafted in Japan by furniture-maker Karimoku, the minimalist instrument features unique grain patterns, with 88 keys crafted from a wood and plastic hybrid structure. In contrast to most other digital pianos (which employ sampling/pre-recorded sounds from other pianos), this particular machine employs Roland’s heartier piano modeling, lending a fullness reminiscent of an acoustic piano.

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Matchaeologist

Ceremonial-Grade Matcha Tasting Set

$59

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From Kyoto-based Matchaeologist comes a new ceremonial-grade matcha tasting set incorporating three different blends: Misaki, Matsu, and Meiko. This very collection has repeatedly won the highest award from Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, when judged on everything from aroma and taste to color. The tea itself is as high-quality as possible, worth of the ceremony for sure—but also capable of winning over new matcha coverts.

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