Grindr’s 500+ Gaymojis

With references to online dating culture and the queer community lexicon, Grindr’s new set of 500+ emojis fills a clear visual communication void with clever new options. From a rainbow heart to men raining from a cloud, there are fun, bright options—some of which are shorthand for fantasies and desires. All of them fit within six categories: Mood, Profile, Body, Dating + Sex, Objects, and …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Inventing transparent wood, saving a language, how emoji is changing the way we communicate and more in this week's look at the web

1. How Empowerment Became a Purchasable Product Originally used by social workers to encourage marginalized communities to rise up from poverty and oppression, the term “empowerment” has taken on completely different definitions in recent years. It’s been transformed into a mass-marketing tactic—especially when pertaining to women—flaunted by corporations (like the #StrengthHasNoGender campaign from Brawny paper towels, a company owned by Koch Brothers who have spent …

The Punkt. MP 01 Mobile Phone

A stripped-down device with just the essentials

In 2015, the idea of not having immediate access to the internet, games and social media apps on your phone has gone from inspiring terror and fear of missing out to sounding increasingly appealing. The ability to disconnect and not constantly check Facebook statuses and work emails has become something to aspire to, as more and more designers create technology to help us move away …

How to Speak Cat

In its latest “Science of Us” webisode, New York Magazine decodes all your cat’s purring and meowing. No matter how indifferent they may seem on the surface, cats are actually highly complex communicators that use a combination of signals and noises to express themselves. While purring may seem like an expression of joy or comfort, it’s actually your kitty’s way of asking you to stay …

Send Video Reactions with Gather App

Convey real personality with the brand new group messaging service

In the age of Snapchat and selfies, nothing conveys an appropriate reaction like one’s own face. That’s the premise behind group messaging app Gather, launched today for iOS. Gather lets users send what they’d normally send to friends or family—screenshots, GIFs, YouTube videos—and receive a brief circular, live-action video reaction right back. The video is tiny enough (about the size of your thumb print) that …