Linder’s “The Bower of Bliss” for Art on the Underground

This large-scale public project celebrates women and explores how they're represented

Every year, almost 17 million journeys are made via the Southwark Underground Station in south London. As of yesterday, instead of regular billboards, commuters are to be met by a new 85-meter-long artwork by Linder, who has been an artist in residence for Transport for London’s Art on the Underground project for the last four months. Her background as a part of the Manchester punk …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Saying goodbye to Kepler, an upstate Witch Camp, Halloween in Tokyo and more in our look around the web

Farewell to NASA’s Kepler Telescope Kepler—the beloved NASA telescope responsible for discovering 70% of the 3,800 confirmed “alien worlds” to date—officially met its end yesterday. After nearly a decade of exploration, the telescope ran out of fuel and can no longer transmit data or focus on transient objects in space. During its time in flight the Kepler was able to study nearly 150,000 stars simultaneously and …

Inside an Upstate NY Witch Camp

Last weekend, at OlioHouse—an unassuming Victorian-style home in Wassaic—a sizable group of 20- and 30-somethings attended Witch Camp. There were no spells cast at the upstate New York location, but there were art classes, sage-burning, a Halloween-themed party and lectures on the witch trials of the 16th and 17th centuries. While witches today don’t face the same horrific repercussions as those in history, Tara Kenny (an Olio …

South Korean Women Destroying Cosmetics in Protest

As part of a movement called “escape the corset,” many South Korean women are destroying their make-up—and sharing the glittery, colorful results on social media. The act is a rebellion against “the strict beauty standards that have become their country’s norm,” but further, the unpaid labor of that beauty. While this is a theme across countless countries, South Korea is the eighth largest cosmetics market in …

Judy Chicago’s Portrayal of Toxic Masculinity Appears in Real Life

Judy Chicago‘s 1985 series Three Faces of Man occurred in real-life this past week—seen in the outrage of three powerful, petulant men unaccustomed to answering for their behavior. Chicago’s painting was unveiled in 1985, but it’s clearly as relevant as ever. As Jonathan D Katz writes for Artsy, “What was once allegory is now reportage, and Chicago’s art from decades past has never looked so current.” While exploring …