Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Saving Nina Simone's childhood home, making better bubbles, and more in our look around the web

1. Art Show Inspired by Philando Castile Open now at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (and free to the public), “Art and Healing: In the Moment” is a show inspired by Philando Castile—a man whose brutal death at the hands of police after being pulled over for what should have been just a traffic stop was not only heinous, but also filmed by his girlfriend. …

Archaeologists Dig at Woodstock ’69 Festival Field

When digging at the famed Woodstock ’69 festival field (located in Bethel, New York—actually about 50 miles from Woodstock itself) archaeologists weren’t looking for love beads, a tassel from Jimi Hendrix’s jacket, or some of the Grateful Dead’s left-over acid tabs. Project director Josh Anderson says, “The overall point of this investigation is to kind of define the stage space… We can use this as …

Nina Simone’s Childhood Home Saved and Made National Treasure

Beloved singer, pianist and activist Nina Simone grew up in a small house in Tryon, North Carolina—and over the years it’s been bought and sold several times, with some owners investing in its restoration. But recently the home was falling into disrepair, until last year several artists—Ellen Gallagher, Rashid Johnson, Julie Mehretu and Adam Pendleton—joined forces and bought it for $95K in order to save …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Antarctica's first-ever Pride celebration, Olafur Eliasson's debut building, underwater data, lawn flamingoes and more

1. Microsoft’s Underwater Data Center One cylinder comprising 864 servers and 27.6 petabytes of storage has been dropped by Microsoft off the coast of Orkney in Scotland. The goal is to see if the tech giant can save energy by cooling in the sea. And the location was chosen as the French-built cylinder will draw power from an undersea cable and the Orkney’s renewable energy …

The Delightful History of the Lawn Flamingo

Don Featherstone might not be a household name, but his life’s work is wildly famous worldwide. Featherstone, just after graduating art school in 1957, created the pink plastic flamingo—undeniably one of the world’s most popular lawn ornaments. Reproduced over 20 million times, Phoenicopterus ruber plasticus (as its creator called it) is more than a kitsch decoration, as Artsy’s Alexxa Gotthardt writes, it’s “a barometer of …