Mark Pritchard feat. Gregory Whitehead: Come Let Us

From his new collection of work The Four Worlds (out 23 March on Warp) comes UK-born, Australia-based Mark Pritchard’s “Come Let Us.” A fascinating track, it features samples of Gregory Whitehead’s “Ziggurat” from Disorder Speech (a 1985 release of audio and radio art) and trippy visuals from the always-impressive Jonathan Zawada. Pritchard pays homage to ’80s cassette culture, avant garde, sound poetry, and dadaism while …

Hillary Clinton’s Unused Confetti is Now Art

On view until 12 August, “Bunny Burson: And Still I Rise” (taking its name from Maya Angelou’s book of poetry) is an installation that has made the unused confetti from Hillary Clinton’s election night into a work of art. Burson tracked down the unused confetti—after being told it was likely in the trash—and turned it into a snow globe-like piece. Burson was at NYC’s Jacob …

The Thanksgiving Reader

Commence dinner a little differently this year with this collection of contemplative readings

We’re approaching that time of the year many people come to dread for its airport travel clogs and the political arguments that await at dinner. Thanksgiving is just T-minus 10 days and this year, entrepreneur and blogger Seth Godin suggests a way to approach annual gatherings a little more consciously—and all it requires is access to a printer. The universal Thanksgiving Reader is a small …

100 Notable Books of 2014

With the year quickly coming to a close, The New York Times Book Review has released their list of the 100 most notable books of 2014. Ranging from fiction to poetry and nonfiction, the comprehensive catalog may be the perfect resource when Christmas shopping for the bibliophiles in your life.

Cut-Ups: William S. Burroughs 1914 – 2014

NYC's Boo-Hooray gallery debuts a centenary exhibition dedicated to the unconventional technique

In October 1959, artist Brion Gysin sliced through a pile of newspapers that were scattered atop his desk. Taken by their presentation, he began to rearrange the clippings and connect passages in the way he found most humorous. Little did he know, this act would inspire colleague William Burroughs to make famous an entirely new artistic technique known as cut-ups—the act of creating new assemblings …