Fall Reading for Children of All Ages

Eight beautiful books on friendship, identity and the world around us

Earlier this year we became smitten with the messages, meaning and heart of “Lulu is a Rhinoceros,” a powerful book for children by Jason and Allison Flom. Pets, the quest for identity, friendship and the value of animals in our lives all make for important themes—worth instilling in youth and revisiting time and time again at any age. The following eight books address various aspects …

We Pay Attention Four Times Per Second

Two new studies in the scientific publication Neuron—authored by research teams from Princeton University and the University of California-Berkeley—posit that attention does not hone in like a spotlight, rather, it strobes in and out four times per second. “Perception is discontinuous,” says Sabine Kastner of Princeton Neuroscience Institute, but it is not flickering on and off entirely. Rather, we cycle between “periods of maximum focus and periods of …

Building a Terrarium is a Testament to Slowing Down

The co-owners of Brooklyn-based Twig, a terrarium-building workshop and store, are trying to turn the hobby into meditative, therapy-like classes. To exert control over your own environment—if even for an hour—is a test of patience and a lesson in creative muscle-building. “For an hour on a weekend afternoon, I didn’t think of anything except the microcosmic forest in front of me and whether its climate …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Colette's swan song, mining in space, the worst sex scenes in literature and more

1. Classes on Mining in Space At the Colorado School of Mines’ Center for Space Resources, a new class called Space Resources Fundamentals is underway, the first-ever academic program specializing in space mining. Christopher Dreyer teaches the course, which is presently in a test run, though potentially slated again for summer 2018. The class covers things like the Outer Space Treaty, which was developed by …

Klemens Schillinger’s Objects Aim to Combat Smartphone Addiction

Designer Klemens Schillinger has created a collection of objects that are essentially substitute phones, with the goal to combat smartphone addiction. Around the same size as most phones, the objects contain stone beads in ways that—when interacted with—imitate the motions we have grown so accustomed to: scrolling, swiping and more. Schillinger says, “More and more often one feels the urge to check their phone, even …