Building a Terrarium is a Testament to Slowing Down

The co-owners of Brooklyn-based Twig, a terrarium-building workshop and store, are trying to turn the hobby into meditative, therapy-like classes. To exert control over your own environmentif even for an houris a test of patience and a lesson in creative muscle-building. “For an hour on a weekend afternoon, I didn’t think of anything except the microcosmic forest in front of me and whether its climate …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Colette's swan song, mining in space, the worst sex scenes in literature and more

1. Classes on Mining in Space At the Colorado School of Mines’ Center for Space Resources, a new class called Space Resources Fundamentals is underway, the first-ever academic program specializing in space mining. Christopher Dreyer teaches the course, which is presently in a test run, though potentially slated again for summer 2018. The class covers things like the Outer Space Treaty, which was developed by …

Klemens Schillinger’s Objects Aim to Combat Smartphone Addiction

Designer Klemens Schillinger has created a collection of objects that are essentially substitute phones, with the goal to combat smartphone addiction. Around the same size as most phones, the objects contain stone beads in ways thatwhen interacted withimitate the motions we have grown so accustomed to: scrolling, swiping and more. Schillinger says, “More and more often one feels the urge to check their phone, even …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Fast food furniture, tech anxiety, tracking product placement and more in our web wrap-up

1. AuthaGraph World Map Corrects Perceptions No map is perfect but those behind AuthaGraph have offered an alternative that addresses size perception. By laying the spherical world out on 96 triangles, which are then transferred to a triangular pyramid, they have been able to depict continents (and countries) in more accurate sizes with regard to one another. When unfolded, this pyramid can either lay flat …

Why We See Faces Everywhere

Whether in a door-hook, electrical socket or elsewhere, seeing faces in objects and places is super-commonand it’s called pareidolia. This is a “psychological phenomenon that causes the human brain to lend significanceand facial features, in particularto random patterns,” according to Artsy. Apparently the phenomenon happens because humans naturally prefer faces to other patterns. Of course, this extends from everyday life into the world of art, …