Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Nokia's banana phone, exploding stars, the world's oldest tattoos and more in our look around the web

1. Amateur Astronomer Photographs Exploding Star An Argentinian amateur astronomer was simply testing out his new 16-inch telescope by taking a bunch of short-exposure photographs when he managed to snap an image believed to be one in 10 million—or even one in 100 million. The photo is of an exploding star in a distant galaxy—a visual that professionals have been hoping to capture for a …

Amateur Astronomer Photographs Exploding Star

An Argentinian amateur astronomer was simply testing out his new 16-inch telescope by taking a bunch of short-exposure photographs when he managed to snap an image believed to be one in 10 million—or even one in 100 million. The photo is of an exploding star in a distant galaxy—a visual that professionals have been hoping to capture for a long time. UC Berkeley astronomer Alex …

Star-Spangled Apparel

For the Fourth of July and beyond, celestial-patterned items

The Fourth of July festivities oftentimes involve celebratory outfits of red, white and blue. There’s more to Americana than that, however—and clearly more to the nation’s flag. Both striped and star-spangled items denote participation. And this year, we’ve opted for starry pieces that are wearable long after the holiday has passed. From unisex T-shirts and caps to embroidered shorts and more, we selected a few …

Hubble’s New Galactic Finds

10,000 times more luminous than our Milky Way, a series of the universe’s “brightest infrared galaxies” have been captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Using a natural phenomenon called gravitation lensing, the galactic imagery has been magnified to “reveal a tangled web of misshapen objects punctuated by exotic patterns, such as rings and arcs,” according to NASA. What’s even more curious about the shapes: speculating …

Astronomy Rewind

The newly launched NASA-funded project called Astronomy Rewind calls on people to uncover old, lost cosmic images to create a public database. Hopefully, this will allow for astronomers to discover a great deal more about our galaxy, and shed extra light on science history. Hosted by Zooniverse (a citizen-science platform that relies on one million volunteers), the project will certainly be interesting—even if no new …