Modern in the Past Tense

The New York School of Interior Design recreates the seminal show "What Modern Was" in a new exhibit and discussion

When the traveling exhibition “Design 1935-1965: What Modern Was” opened in 1991, the accompanying 424-page catalog startled the industry with its declaration that the Modern period was over, and should, from that point, be spoken about in the past tense. Subsequently revered as the bible for mid-century decorative arts, the heavy tome’s distinct perspective came from four years of scholarly research of the thirty-year period, …

Peter Doig

Ethereal landscapes and moody figurative scenes in Peter Doig's comprehensive new monograph

Best known for melancholy and dreamlike renditions of bucolic landscapes, Scottish artist Peter Doig has become one of the most internationally-celebrated painters of his generation. The distinction is all the more striking for a modern artist given such ordinary-seeming subjects and his chosen medium—painterly figurative work initially put him on the global stage in the ’90s. In a new slipcased monograph of the Turner Prize-winner’s …

Patterns That Connect: Social Symbolism in Ancient & Tribal Art

A comprehensive study of tribal art

American art historian Carl Schuster spent more than three decades traveling the world exploring tribal customs and patterns, gathering ancient tribal art and artifacts along the way. Though his goal was to illustrate the intrinsic human connection to artistic expression in an anthropological study, Shuster never managed to compile his research into a cohesive form. With the help of a fellow anthropologist, Edmund Carter, who …