Indigenous Communities Restore Oceans With Seaweed Cultivation

From Hawaii to Alaska to British Columbia, Indigenous communities cultivate seaweed in order to restore it, fortify ancestral knowledge, support food sovereignty and mitigate climate change. While each community has their own initiative specific to their culture and environment, all follow Indigenous understandings of interconnectedness. In Hawaii, for instance, community group Limu Hui seeks to rehabilitate the Hawaiian red algae known as limu kohu, which …

Stories of Climate Change’s Effects on Every Country

The New York Times Opinion section recently published “Postcards From a World on Fire,” a collection of sounds, photos, videos and vignettes that capture climate change’s effects on different countries around the world. Between reports from Morocco, which indicate that two thirds of its oases have disappeared, and photographs from Guatemala that depict how climate refugees and migrants are fleeing harrowing droughts, this comprehensive exploration …

Building an Army of Oysters Around NYC To Mitigate Floods + Erosion

Before commercial harvesting, oyster reefs used to compose more than 220,000 acres of New York’s coastline, acting as a natural flood-mitigation system in addition to increasing marine biodiversity. With these reefs’ destruction, New York is dangerously vulnerable to natural disasters—a threat that (as Hurricane Ida recently showed) is only growing. To protect the city, Billion Oyster Project founded by Urban Assembly New York Harbor School, …