Scientists Transform Cabbage Into Stronger Concrete

A team of scientists at the University of Tokyo set out to make concrete from leftover food waste, including coffee grounds, tea leaves, onions, pumpkin, seaweed, orange and banana peel. The researchers didn’t just succeed, finding that all of the food (save for the pumpkin) created strong building material; but they also ascertained that Chinese cabbage crafts the sturdiest material—one that’s three times stronger than …

New Low-Cost Material Can Pull Buckets of Drinking Water from the Air

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin developed a low-cost gel film that can pull multiple liters of drinking water from the air—even in arid conditions—and release it easily. The material is made up of two common and inexpensive ingredients: konjac gum and cellulose. The gum’s porous structure attracts water from the air, while the cellulose, when responding to gentle heat, turns hydroponic and …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Power from waves, two sneaker innovations, an Alzheimer's breakthrough and more from around the web

Nike ISPA’s Link Axis Sneakers Are Designed to be Disassembled and Recycled New from Nike ISPA (which stands for improvise, scavenge, protect and adapt), the Link and Link Axis sneaker models are designed to further the brand’s future in circular design. The sneakers are constructed from three modules that interlock rather than relying on glue, meaning they can easily be disassembled and recycled after use. …