A Forest Submerged for 60,000 Years Might Provide New Medicines

A massive underwater forest buried beneath 10 feet of sand sat preserved in the Gulf of Mexico for nearly 60,000 years until Hurricane Ivan uncovered it in 2004. The forest’s bare cypress trees then became subject to shipworms, a wood-eating creature with an insatiable appetite. Researchers are collecting these worms (60 feet under) to study their chemical potential to produce live-saving medicines. They must move …

Eating Sea Urchins Could Restore the Ocean’s Ecosystem

Contrary to reports that conservation is the only way to save our oceans, one company’s hypothesis suggests that eating more sea urchins (urchin roe or uni in Japanese) could actually help restore balance in the aquatic ecosystem. Urchinomics (the aptly named organization testing this theory) found urchins thriving in waters now abandoned by predators due to pollution, heating or overfishing. Increased urchin populations means trouble …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Bubble submarines, solar farms, electric Kombi vans, and more innovation from around the world

Heliogen’s Solar Farm Could Drastically Reduce Global Emissions Backed by Bill Gates, clean energy company Heliogen has developed a concentrated solar energy source that could eliminate carbon-emitting industrial processes—essentially “transforming sunlight to create and replace fuels.” The advancement would allow heavy machinery to forego fossil fuels and employ those created from the process (like hydrogen or syngas), ultimately reducing global carbon emissions by 10%. The …