Horses Can Read Human Emotions

A new study conducted by psychologists at Sussex University has revealed the surprising sophistication of horses’ social capabilities. They’re able to recognize human emotions through facial expressions and can even do so through a picture. The team showed large prints of human faces—both smiling and frowning—to 28 horses, and their reactions were clear. Horses reacting to angry facial expressions had an increase in heart rate …

The Chattiest States in the US

Market analytics firm Marchex analyzed over two million phone calls made between 2013 and 2015 to determine the fastest, slowest and most verbose states in the US. Turns out, the results aren’t too far off of what you might already expect. New Yorkers pulled way ahead of other states in terms of word density while states in the south showcased their southern drawl with slower …

The Negative Side Effects of Faking It

According to a recent study conducted by Maryam Kouchaki of Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, acting inauthentically can spark unforeseen psychological consequences. When asked to describe an instance of faking an emotion, participants displayed feelings of uncleanliness and sought the need for moral compensation. In other words, faking it until you make it actually just leads us further away from the end goal. In a …