How “Now That’s What I Call Music” Became a Juggernaut

Launching 28 November 1983 in the UK (and 27 October 1998 in the US), “Now That’s What I Call Music” has become a bastion of record sales in an ever-changing industry. In its origin nation, the compilation series has now reached its 100th edition. Not to mention more than 120 million records have been sold (and the albums have spent 654 weeks at number one). …

“Call Me By Your Name” Soundtrack on Peach-Scented Vinyl

You either know what “the peach scene” is or you don’t. That said, the memorable moment from Luca Guadagnino’s film “Call Me By Your Name” has inspired a peach-scented (and peach-colored) vinyl soundtrack release. The limited edition “Peach Season” edition will be released on 3 August, and kept to only 7,777 copies. The record features the acclaimed Sufjan Stevens tracks featured in the film, the …

Prince: Mary Don’t You Weep

From the upcoming posthumous Prince live album Piano & A Microphone: 1983, a divine rework of the spiritual “Mary Don’t You Weep” was released on what would have been the beloved icon’s 60th birthday. Recorded at the Kiowa Trail studio at Prince’s home on Lake Riley, the versions are stripped back and moving—you can even hear Prince sniffle a couple times around the 3:28 mark. …

Kanye West’s Project Wyoming Listening Tour Hits Williamsburg

A new type of musical experience unfolds in Brooklyn and elsewhere around the States

It’s not every day that an artist turns his album listening party into a nationwide tour, but then again, Kanye West is not an average artist. While the world waited for the release of Ye, West, with the help of famed content creator turned artist manager YesJulz of 1AM, was busy coordinating the travel for his friends, press, influencers, and others to join him in …

Massive Attack Album to be Stored in DNA

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Massive Attack’s Mezzanine, the band has worked with scientists from ETH Zurich in order to preserve the record in DNA. Once it’s coded in DNA, the record could last up to thousands of years—yet the result cannot truly be seen with the naked eye. In order to store the 11-track record, the team believes they will need some “5,000 …