Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Saying goodbye to Kepler, an upstate Witch Camp, Halloween in Tokyo and more in our look around the web

Farewell to NASA’s Kepler Telescope Kepler—the beloved NASA telescope responsible for discovering 70% of the 3,800 confirmed “alien worlds” to date—officially met its end yesterday. After nearly a decade of exploration, the telescope ran out of fuel and can no longer transmit data or focus on transient objects in space. During its time in flight the Kepler was able to study nearly 150,000 stars simultaneously and …

Google’s Pixel 3 Offers Photographic Breakthrough for Less

The new device takes camera phones to a new, mind-blowing level

For the first time in human history, an entire generation does not remember life before photographs could be taken at an exceptional level. We are now more attuned to the quality of photography, and more literate in what that means (and skilled in retouching) than ever before. Photographic literacy is a form of communication, and even the smallest children are adept. What’s about to happen …

Shibuya’s Impressive Halloween Celebrations

Tokyo—specifically Shibuya—is one big, well-costumed party in a new photo series by Kawasaki-based photographer Ko Sasaki. Over the past decade, Halloween celebrations have been gaining momentum in Japan, and the costumes—ranging from classic to unconventional—are wildly impressive. Visit Afar to see all the corpse brides, witches, aliens and more.

Testing DJI’s Mavic 2 Pro

We take the new and improved camera drone for a few flights

Once again, DJI has moved the goalposts, improving drone photography radically—and at the price of an affordable DSLR. Partnering with Hasselblad, they created the new Mavic 2 Pro, which includes an optical adjustable aperture from f/2.8 to f/11 and a huge, one-inch sensor. This solves one of the biggest pain-points in consumer-approachable drone photography—prior to now, the photo and video quality was barely useable beyond display on …

Photographs Taken Through a Lens Made of Ice

Photographer Mathieu Stern recently took a self-funded trip to Iceland to take some photos, but the difference is that his camera lens was made from ice. Yes, they turned out a bit (poetically) blurry, but otherwise the idea worked. After 45 minutes of crafting, Stern took shots of the surrounding scenery, the people who’d joined him and the fleeting icebergs—all before the ice lens melted …