Pompeii’s Unearthed Stash of Ancient Charms and Amulets

When Pompeii met its sudden end more than 2,000 years ago, the city was buried with many treasures intact. With every archaeological dig there, remarkable insight into Roman life is revealed. A recent dig inside the House of the Garden unearthed the remains of 10 people and a collection of gems, beads, shells and amulets—once housed in a wooden box. There are phallic charms oftentimes …

Recreating a Perfume Worn in Ancient Egypt

Amidst an excavation of the ancient Egyptian city Thmuis, researchers uncovered the ruins of a fragrance factory dating back to 300 BC. The site contained tiny glass perfume jars, imported clay amphoras and an ancient sludge. The latter was brought to ancient Egyptian perfume experts who then replicated residue based on recipes—featuring myrrh, cardamom, green olive oil, and cinnamon—found in materia medica texts. (An act …

Spotlighting the Women Credited with Inventing Popular Music

NPR’s “Turning the Tables” series works to flip the script of various industries’ histories. One edition celebrates the women that invented the genre of American popular music: Bessie, Maybelle, Billie, Marian, Ella, Mary Lou, Celia and Rosetta. “The goal is to free the music of women and others who don’t fit the dominant straight-white-male paradigm from special categories, and put it at the center, where …