Gravity Images Reveal Lost Continents Under Antarctica

For four years, the European Space Agency’s Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite accumulated data on Earth’s gravitational field. Now, scientists are using that information to best understand what lies beneath Antarctica’s ice sheets. Here, they’re learning that East and West Antarctica bear fundamental differences, including lithosphere thickness. Underneath the former, there are actually several similarities to the continent’s closest neighbors. Read more at VICE.

Ancient Bathroom Humor Discovered

Uncovered this week in Turkey, inside what was once a Roman latrine, are a bunch of dirty jokes that date back to the second century. Two mosaics depict well-known Greek and Roman characters, Narcissus and Ganymede—only the scenes are a little different than the myths we know. In one, Narcissus is staring at his penis, obsessed; in the other, Ganymede (who was kidnapped by the eagle of Zeus) …

NASA’s First 8K Video

NASA has its first 8K video from space, and it shows the Expedition 56 team hard at work—as well as a few shots of Earth from afar. The project, which was completed in collaboration with the European Space Agency, hopes to show the world that “the science being conducted aboard the International Space Station is answering questions that hold the keys to our future in space …

Made From Vantablack and Meteorite: LUCY by Ore

One ring connected to the cosmos

Made with Vantablack (the pigment so dark, it traps 99.96% of incoming light), meteorite and gold-plated microcircuitry, LUCY is much more than any other super-polished, sphere-shaped ring. Each ring is connected to its wearer’s own white dwarf star and vibrates when that star reaches its zenith. The “magical ceremony” (happening multiple times a week) encourages the wearer to pause, center and reconnect with the space around them. …

Leonardo da Vinci’s Ultra-Rare Eye Condition

According to new research, Leonardo da Vinci’s ability to understand distance and depth is the result of an ultra-rare eye condition known as exotropia. This condition turns one pupil outward, limiting the traditional understanding of depth when looking at things—which essentially would have turned the world around da Vinci into a flat canvas. This unique perspective, the new study claims, made it easier for the …