How Ancient Roman Concrete Self-Heals

The durability of ancient Roman structures has long been a mystery to scientists who have sought to determine how early concrete endured for over two millennia. A new study resolves the enigma, focusing on an inclusion (often disregarded as a byproduct) that allows Roman concrete to repair itself: chunks of material referred to as lime clasts. Scientists have found that the clasts are made up of …

Massive Species that Resembles a Floppy-Eared Hound Discovered in Burgess Shale

With fossils dating back 500 million years ago, the well-preserved Burgess Shale in British Columbia is home to increasingly unlocked mysteries of the Cambrian Period, the era in which many of Earth’s major groups of animals appeared. From this site, researchers recently identified a new species: Balhuticaris voltae, a bivalved arthropod (“distantly similar to today’s crustaceans,” according to Popular Mechanics) with bean-shaped eyes and a …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Mysterious astrophysical activity, edible concrete, tables from fallen trees and more from around the web

How Indigenous People are Reclaiming Water Rights Water is not only a basic necessity; for many Indigenous peoples, it holds spiritual and cultural significance. However, colonialism and extractive industries separated Indigenous people from their waterways, contaminating them while endangering historical and cultural sites. Over the years, Indigenous groups like The Pueblo Action Alliance have found ways to reclaim their water rights. Currently, they are fighting …