Researchers May Have Found the Earliest Drawing

In South Africa’s Blombos Cave, researchers have discovered what is believed to be the world’s earliest drawing. The drawing—a crosshatch made on one rock using another—predates other uncovered art by a whopping 30,000 years. Researchers claim, though, that this by no means makes the Blombos Cave people artists, rather it identifies their interest in “graphical designs,” says Chantal Tribolo from Bordeaux Montaigne University. The team admits …

10,000-Year-Old Crayon Found in North Yorkshire

When on a dig along England’s eastern coastline (near Scarborough, North Yorkshire), a group of archaeologists came across a crayon that’s been aged 10,000 years. This Stone Age “sharpened stick of red ochre” is likely to have been for making markings on various surfaces, though that’s not the only possibility. Measuring less than an inch, the crayon could have also been used to paint the …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Cameras made from drinking straws, the possible return of a classic Nokia, the world's tallest atrium and more

1. Royal Egyptian Scribe’s 3,000-Year-Old Tomb Dating back to the Ramesside period, around 1200 BCE, a tomb has been unearthed on the west bank of the Nile in Egypt. Japanese archaeologists, led by Waseda University Professor Jiro Kondo, made the discovery and researchers have already deduced that the tomb belonged to Khonsu, a royal scribe. Within, ornate hieroglyphics and ceiling drawings, many of which paid …

Royal Egyptian Scribe’s 3,000-Year-Old Tomb

Dating back to the Ramesside period, around 1200 BCE, a tomb has been unearthed on the west bank of the Nile in Egypt. Japanese archaeologists, led by Waseda University Professor Jiro Kondo, made the discovery and researchers have already deduced that the tomb belonged to Khonsu, a royal scribe. Within, ornate hieroglyphics and ceiling drawings, many of which paid homage to Khonsu, were seen and …

Scientists Have Found Evidence of a Lost Continent of Mauritia

The lost continent of Mauritia is believed to have been pulled apart by geological forces and sunk to the bottom of the sea long, long ago and scientists have just found evidence that might prove that theory. When studying volcanic rocks on the island of Mauritius, scientists found some with zircon crystals embedded in them. The remarkable thing here is that the crystals are some …