Ancient Phallic Graffiti Wasn’t For Laughs

A very familiar symbol has been discovered near Hadrian’s Wall (aka Hadrian’s Wall) in Cumbria, England—only this one dates back to 207 AD. The penis-shaped drawing isn’t just juvenile scribbling, however. According to archeologists from Newcastle University, these images are common and used to adorn doorways, walls and jewelry during the Roman Era (753 BC to 476 AD) and symbolized good fortune—and power. “Phallus graffiti, …

This 2.4-Million-Year-Old Discovery Alters Human History

The discovery of 2.4-million-year-old stone tools in north Africa have—yet again—altered the human origin story. “The evidence from Algeria has changed [our] earlier view regarding East Africa [as] being the cradle of humankind. Actually, the entire Africa was the cradle of humankind,” Mohamed Sahnouni, an archaeologist at Spain’s National Research Center for Human Evolution, says. Humanity’s distant cousin, the hominin, moved north through (and evolved and developed …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

An alien probe, ancient bathroom humor, the mistaken history of chocolate and more

Ancient Bathroom Humor Discovered Uncovered this week in Turkey, inside what was once a Roman latrine, are a bunch of dirty jokes that date back to the second century. Two mosaics depict well-known Greek and Roman characters, Narcissus and Ganymede—only the scenes are a little different than the myths we know. In one, Narcissus is staring down at his penis, obsessed; in the other, Ganymede (who was …