Link About It: This Week’s Picks

An alien probe, ancient bathroom humor, the mistaken history of chocolate and more

Ancient Bathroom Humor Discovered Uncovered this week in Turkey, inside what was once a Roman latrine, are a bunch of dirty jokes that date back to the second century. Two mosaics depict well-known Greek and Roman characters, Narcissus and Ganymede—only the scenes are a little different than the myths we know. In one, Narcissus is staring down at his penis, obsessed; in the other, Ganymede (who was …

Ancient Bathroom Humor Discovered

Uncovered this week in Turkey, inside what was once a Roman latrine, are a bunch of dirty jokes that date back to the second century. Two mosaics depict well-known Greek and Roman characters, Narcissus and Ganymede—only the scenes are a little different than the myths we know. In one, Narcissus is staring at his penis, obsessed; in the other, Ganymede (who was kidnapped by the eagle of Zeus) …

Researchers May Have Found the Earliest Drawing

In South Africa’s Blombos Cave, researchers have discovered what is believed to be the world’s earliest drawing. The drawing—a crosshatch made on one rock using another—predates other uncovered art by a whopping 30,000 years. Researchers claim, though, that this by no means makes the Blombos Cave people artists, rather it identifies their interest in “graphical designs,” says Chantal Tribolo from Bordeaux Montaigne University. The team admits …

10,000-Year-Old Crayon Found in North Yorkshire

When on a dig along England’s eastern coastline (near Scarborough, North Yorkshire), a group of archaeologists came across a crayon that’s been aged 10,000 years. This Stone Age “sharpened stick of red ochre” is likely to have been for making markings on various surfaces, though that’s not the only possibility. Measuring less than an inch, the crayon could have also been used to paint the …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Cameras made from drinking straws, the possible return of a classic Nokia, the world's tallest atrium and more

1. Royal Egyptian Scribe’s 3,000-Year-Old Tomb Dating back to the Ramesside period, around 1200 BCE, a tomb has been unearthed on the west bank of the Nile in Egypt. Japanese archaeologists, led by Waseda University Professor Jiro Kondo, made the discovery and researchers have already deduced that the tomb belonged to Khonsu, a royal scribe. Within, ornate hieroglyphics and ceiling drawings, many of which paid …