National Geographic on How Science Fiction Informs the Future

Word would travel of scientist Giovanni Aldini’s electric reanimation experiments on dead criminals in 1803 to author Mary Shelley before the 1818 publish of her book Frankenstein. It was an instance of science informing fiction. In turn, Shelley’s masterpiece would then inspire scientist Earl Bakken to develop the first wearable, battery-operated pacemaker. This is only one example of science fiction triggering the pursuit of scientific …

French Inventor Flies Hoverboard Halfway Across English Channel

Last week, French inventor Franky Zapata previewed mobility technology that he claimed would propel him across the English Channel (from France to England) in only 20 minutes. His first formal attempt occurred earlier today. Though Zapata didn’t quite make it all of the way—waves in the channel displaced his refueling station (situated 11 miles from the English city of Dover) by centimeters and he ultimately …

TED 2018: Why You Should Make Useless Things

Simone Giertz's discusses inventions, failure, performance anxiety and more

In a charming and humorous talk from TED 2018, maker and robotics enthusiast Simone Giertz does more than share her wacky and “useless” inventions; she explores the ways in which failure and performance anxiety can be embraced and overcome. While showcasing her “shitty inventions” (such as a googly-eye shirt, toothbrush helmet and more) Giertz explains the importance of making “useless” things, and how the outcome …