Earth’s Oldest Asteroid Impact is Two Billion Years Old

The oldest asteroid collision on the planet, the Yarrabubba impact crater in Western Australia, is a whopping 2.229 billion years old. After analyzing minerals at the crater site, researchers have found the asteroid hit at the end of an era called Snowball Earth (one of the planet’s ice ages). Scientists, led by Dr Timmons Erickson (a geochronologist at Houston’s NASA Johnson Space Center), studied around …

Best of CH 2019: Link About It

Scientific breakthroughs, surprising design collaborations and beyond

As we publish our own original articles throughout the year, we also share insightful stories and videos from publications we respect. Crucial for our growth as writers, these pieces inform us as readers, listeners and learners. From the inspiring and interesting to the challenging and counterpointing, we promote these stories in our ever-growing Link About It section. There, they spotlight significant changes in our world, …

Pursuing Life on a Planet That’s 1,000 Years Away

Earth will not be hospitable to humans forever, and if we wish to prolong our existence we need to consider the idea of relocating. Mars, while conveniently close, likely cannot host life without extensive adaptation. Proxima b (which orbits the star Proxima Centauri) proves more possible, as its surface temperatures could accommodate water and thus life. But the journey in a ship big enough to …