Paleontologists Discover a Swimming Dinosaur

In Mongolia’s Gobi Desert, scientists discovered the bones of a previously unknown dinosaur species, Natovenator polydontus, the first and only dinosaur found that had specific adaptions suited for swimming. Hailing from prehistoric Mongolia about 71 million years ago, the Natovenator was a “many-toothed hunting swimmer” that measured around a foot long. A relative of the Velociraptor and other sharp-toothed predators, the new species has distinct traits—like …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Apollo mission photography restored, pulverizing glass for coastal restoration, bowfin regurgitalite and more

Recycling Glass into Sand and Gravel to Fight Climate Change Founded in 2020, Glass Half Full is a New Orleans-based startup that recycles glass to make sand and gravel to be used in disaster relief, construction, new products and boosting coastal restoration—an issue particularly pertinent to Louisiana where coastal degradation occurs aggressively. After sourcing discarded glass from their donation service, as well as local restaurants …

150-Million-Year-Old Fossilized Vomit Discovered in Utah

In southeast Utah, paleontologists discovered 150-million-year-old fossilized vomit that offers new insight about Jurassic ecosystems. While surveying the Morrison Formation, a famous paleontological site, the team came across an odd pile of amphibian bones (including ones that were only 0.12 inches long) and regurgitalite (the fossilized form of vomit). Scientists suspect that a bowfin fish is likely behind the puke, as they were not only …