Prehistoric Reptile Fossils Suggest How The Loch Ness Monster Might Have Existed

The fossils of a plesiosaur (a marine reptile with a long neck and four long flippers, that existed in the Mesozoic era) found in a 100-million-year-old riverbed in Morocco’s Sahara Desert contribute to the theory that “saltwater sea creatures may have lived in freshwater systems.” Remarkably, researchers at the University of Bath have applied this theory to Loch Ness and its fantastical monster, Nessie, telling the …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

A "bonkers" dinosaur discovery, candy-colored planes, chatty fungi and more

Scientists Plan to Uncover Yorkshire’s Sunken “Atlantis” Daniel Parsons, a professor of sedimentology who leads the University of Hull’s Energy and Environment Institute, plans to utilize high-resolution sonar systems (along with insight from local fisherman) to uncover the sunken port town of Ravenser Odd. This ancient village was destroyed in the 14th century due to weather-induced coastal erosion, and studies of similar circumstances in the …

Fossil Dated to The Very Day of Dinosaur Extinction

In a discovery described as “absolutely bonkers” by Phillip Manning, professor of natural history at the University of Manchester, scientists have found a leg belonging to a thescelosaurus that died on the day an asteroid strike killed the dinosaurs. The leg—which is perfectly preserved and even has skin still attached—is embedded with “debris from the impact, which rained down only in its immediate aftermath.” Scientists …