Why 2,000-Year-Old Roman Concrete Still Stands

How is it that 2000 years later, certain Roman ruins still stand in harbors? Geologists have determined that it pertains to one of the components—aluminum tobermorite, a rare mineral found in volcanic ash. When struck with seawater (another component of Roman concrete, along with lime and rock), a possolanic reaction occurs where the tobermorite crystallizes and spreads—adding further strength. Thus, longterm seawater exposure only reinforces …

Two Amateur Divers Accidentally Discover Roman-Era Treasure

While exploring a sunken ship in the ancient port of Caesarea, two amateur divers stumbled upon the largest trove of Roman-era artifacts in Israel in three decades. Bronze statues, lamps, jars, and thousands of coins featuring the faces of Constantine and Licinius were uncovered—some dating back to the fourth century AD. The treasure likely ended up down there after a storm wrecked a ship nearly …

2014 OUTDOOR Urban Art Festival in Rome

15 artists from six different countries come together for NUfactory's ephemeral celebration of street art

At the recent private preview of the OUTDOOR Urban Art Festival in Rome, we were approached by two men in their 60s while we stood outside of the massive gates of an abandoned house in San Lorenzo. While uninvited, they were welcomed by curator Francesco Dobrovich, and we embarked on a tour together in which the men expressed an incredible knowledge of the Roman street …