Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Tons of hidden diamonds, Jupiter's new moons, America's last Blockbuster and more

1. Some Recently Discovered Moons of Jupiter are Weirder Than Others Scott Sheppard’s astronomy division at the Carnegie Institution for Science hunts for objects in very distant parts of our Solar System. Sometimes, however, they’re able to scour areas closer—depending on the orbit of planets intersecting with their work. When the latter scenario arose with Jupiter, Sheppard and his colleagues discovered 10 new moons—bringing the …

NYC Expands the Role of the Library Card

Three library card systems divide New York City: the New York Public Library (for Manhattan, Staten Island and the Bronx, the Queens Library and the Brooklyn Public Library. Membership cards at all three will now offer a “culture pass” program granting free admittance to 33 museums and cultural institutions across the city. Cardholders can reserve two tickets at a time, with no limit on the …

Snarkitecture’s “Fun House” at the National Building Museum, DC

After a decade working together, a comprehensive museum exhibition for the experimental designers

Design practice Snarkitecture has succeeded in a way most artists can only dream. Their work, always wildly different from project to project, undeniably bears a visual signature. Often when viewing a new architectural piece in their repertoire, one must stop and address internal awe before a dawn of recognition sets in: this was made possible by Alex Mustonen, Daniel Arsham and Benjamin Porto. They wear …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Swimming pools, fireworks, Dragon drones and more in our look around the web

1. University of Tokyo’s Dragon Drone Transforms While Midair Calling the University of Tokyo’s new drone the Dragon doesn’t just reference its form, the name is also an acronym short for “Dual-rotor embedded multilink Robot with the Ability of multi-deGree-of-freedom aerial transformatiON.” Composed of several small drones, powered by a pair of ducted fans that can thrust in almost any direction, the high-flyer can autonomously …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Chocolate-covered jellyfish, a floating pyramid city, pizza museums and more in our look around the web

1. Chocolate-Covered Jellyfish, a Recipe to Reduce Their Soaring Population A common problem across the Mediterranean, Japan and Sweden, soaring jellyfish populations are wreaking havoc on local businesses and infrastructure—from clogging up pipes at a power plant to making swimming impossible to overwhelming the fishing industry. Among the many ideas to mitigate the problem, a company called GoJelly is proposing several options: “an array of …