Knitters Chronicle Climate Change With “Temperature Scarves”

From the “sky scarf” of the early aughts to the Tempestry Project today, knitters tap into climate change for guidance in their stitching. While the former accessory is about aesthetic inspiration, the latter aims to preserve data reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration through “temperature scarves.” These are two examples of the way colorful yarns tie into the climate crisis and our reaction …

Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Innovation in space food and slime, an artist's sudden success, and why we should eat more sea urchins

The Future of Space Food MIT Media Lab’s Space Exploration Initiative focuses on all kinds of research and preparation for “the day when humanity becomes a space-native civilization, as comfortable in thFrom slime to space, tech and textilese cosmos as we have been on Earth.” The team (made up of 50+ graduate students, staff, scientists, designers, and engineers) works on countless aspects of space travel, …

Eating Sea Urchins Could Restore the Ocean’s Ecosystem

Contrary to reports that conservation is the only way to save our oceans, one company’s hypothesis suggests that eating more sea urchins (urchin roe or uni in Japanese) could actually help restore balance in the aquatic ecosystem. Urchinomics (the aptly named organization testing this theory) found urchins thriving in waters now abandoned by predators due to pollution, heating or overfishing. Increased urchin populations means trouble …