Link About It: This Week’s Picks

60 years of NASA, life imitating art, food technology, data privacy and more

Judy Chicago’s Portrayal of Toxic Masculinity Appears in Real Life

Judy Chicago‘s 1985 series Three Faces of Man occurred in real-life this past week—seen in the outrage of powerful, petulant men unaccustomed to answering for their behavior. Chicago’s painting was unveiled in 1985, but it’s clearly as relevant as ever. As Jonathan D Katz writes for Artsy, “What was once allegory is now reportage, and Chicago’s art from decades past has never looked so current.” While exploring the concept of men’s behavior and actions, Chicago says she found, “The prohibitions around openly expressing feelings—particularly of vulnerability as expressed in tears—caused innumerable personality distortions.” Read more at Artsy.

Art Fairs Descend Upon London for Frieze Week

From Old Masters to contemporary African art, many prestigious fairs will temporarily open for London’s Frieze Week. Frieze London and Frieze Masters—in Regent’s Park—will once again be the anchor event, but this year sees many other pop-ups worth visiting. There’s 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair at Somerset House, PAD London at Mayfair’s Berkeley Square, plus Moniker and Sunday art fairs kick off in the city, as well. Head over to artnet News for more information.

Neptune-Sized Moon Discovered Outside Our Solar System

Some 8,000 light-years away, a moon has been discovered—possibly the first one outside our own solar system. Dubbed an “exomoon,” the “Neptune-sized” gassy object, which orbits a “Jupiter-sized” planet, was spotted by Columbia University astronomers via the Kepler and Hubble space telescopes. It’s “unlike anything scientists have seen before, and even if this turns out to be a false find, the experience has offered valuable insight on how to find a possible moon by surveying the planet first. Learn more at the Washington Post.

New Technology Hopes to Transform the Food Industry

The food industry has garnered near universal flack for its lack of transparency, mistreatment of animals and environmental impact. Rightfully so in some instances, but technology hopes to alleviate the issues that some producers and consumers otherwise cannot avoid. Foodini, for instance, is a 3D printer that replaces typical plastic ink with edible ingredients, allowing home-cooks and chefs the ability to make an exact amount of something with repetitious likeness. Another innovation, called Apeel, will use the leftovers in a wine press to coat perishable fruits and produces with an invisible and tasteless layer that can extend shelf-life threefold. Read more about the technologies that are hoping to revolutionize food production and consumption at the Wall Street Journal.

From The Seeds Up: The Future of Fruits and Vegetables

At New York’s first-ever Variety Showcase—organized by the Culinary Breeding Network from Oregon, and GrowNYC—chefs, plant-breeders, farmers and others in the food industry joined together to discuss and present examples of the future of produce. One of the many goals of the showcase includes developing ideas—and in-turn seeds—that produce foods which taste better, reduce waste and meet the specific needs of chefs and cooks. While much of these “bespoke seeds” result in out-of-the-ordinary fruits and vegetables, each serves a specific, and arguably necessary, purpose. Read more about the futuristic developments and learn about specific farm-to-table ingredients (like Deep Purple kale) at Grub Street.

World Wide Web Inventor’s New Personal Data Project

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, hopes to help internet users reclaim their personal data—and ultimately their privacy. His newest project, Solid, is a place to store information. Users can take the data with them and transfer it immediately to any app, workspace or website (if they agree to). “Solid is a platform, built using the existing web. It gives every user a choice about where data is stored, which specific people and groups can access select elements, and which apps you use. It allows you, your family and colleagues, to link and share data with anyone. It allows people to look at the same data with different apps at the same time,” Berners-Lee says. Read more about the power-to-the-people project at 9to5Mac.

60 Years of NASA

In 1958, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) was formed after the Soviet Union launched their Sputnik satellite into the cosmos, and ever since the agency has explored distant worlds. In a sprawling graphic (made by a team consisting of Emily Barone, Jeffrey Kluger and Lon Tweeten) every NASA spacecraft ever launched is noted, tracked and dated. Excluding tests and failed missions, the list spans the ’50s through today—from the moon to Mars and beyond. Zooming out and viewing the USA’s obsession with space sheds light on how far we’ve gone, and concurrently, how little we’ve really seen. See more at Time.

Adobe Unveils an All-New Acrobat DC

Adobe’s all-new Acrobat DC aims to streamline the review process for creatives—thanks to new tools that make sharing PDFs with clients much easier. The program acts as a kind of hub—hosted on Adobe Document Cloud—where designers can offer access to their work to anyone via link or invite, check to see if invitees have looked yet, set deadlines and reminders, view feedback and more. Taking much of the dread out of sharing projects for review, this new system could be a game-changer. Read more about the update at Adobe.

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The Apple iPhone XS and the Dawn of Computational Photography

After a couple weeks with the new device, it's the camera that's most impressive

The hype whenever Apple introduces a new product is that it’s “revolutionary.” That’s quite literally hyperbole because very few companies debut something that truly creates a sea change with any sort of consistency. But the new iPhone XS and XS Max actually are revolutionary, especially because they herald a different kind of photography in your pocket that has never been possible before. To understand how and why, …

NASA Technology Could End Food Waste

“Hyperspectral imaging”—technology that allows someone to scan foods for imperfections, ripeness and contamination—will drastically cut the amount of waste in the food industry. Because photographs of produce can be used to determine problems, physical probing or complete destruction won’t be necessary. Thus, contaminated, unripe or imperfect foods can be spotted without ruining consumable ones—hopefully cutting back on our waste rate, which is at about 33% …

Autonomous Air-Taxis May Only Be a Few Years Away

SkyRyse, a start-up founded by 28-year-old Mark Groden, is set on bringing an autonomous air-taxi to the market within the next decade. Other, larger companies (like Uber and Volocopter) share the same goal, but SkyRyse is expediting the process by installing autonomous technology into pre-existing aircrafts. Skipping the exhausting process of building out an expensive fleet, their to-market goal is much more attainable—meaning we may see pilot-less …

France to Ban Smartphones at Schools

It began in 2017: French officials imposed a law that limited how frequently and in what manner employers may contact employees outside of office hours. Now, the French government is setting their sights on schools. Smartphone-less students, they believe, will improve classroom efficiency, effectiveness and, on a broader level, preserve the “sanctity” of the classroom and learning experience. This new law will, however, make “exceptions …