This Font Might Improve Your Memory

A new typeface—the result of a collaboration between RMIT University’s design school and its behavioral business lab—may increase the amount of information we retain from reading. Called Sans Forgetica, it was conceptualized for students cramming for big exams. With lots of backward slants and gaps, the type makes use of a design principle called “desirable difficulty” which slows the reader down, resulting in more retention …

Advancing the Ancient Lettering of the New York Times Nameplate

Even before the Gutenberg printing press, Gothic (also known as Blackletter) was a well-known letterform—with roots dating back to the 700s. Gutenberg would make it the first-ever font. And, centuries later, Henry Jarvis Raymond would use it in the nameplate of his newspaper the New-York Daily Times, today known as the New York Times. Since the paper’s inception, the nameplate’s received many tweaks—from dropping the …

Real Stories Behind Recognizable Streetwear Typefaces

If you have your finger even slightly on the street style pulse, you’d have no doubt seen the Life of Pablo, Thrasher and Supreme logos all over the world—on everything from T-shirts to doormats. While it’s common to know the brands and even their CEO’s names, it’s rare to know exactly who designed the well-known typefaces. Noah Lehava of Coveteur has delved deeper into Gothic, …